‘Enormous’ loss of sand revealed by historic Stockton beach photos

27/08/2018 Posted by admin

‘Enormous’ loss of sand revealed by historic Stockton beach photos VANISHING ACT: Geoff Smith on Stockton beach is 1981 with his daughters Alysha, left, and Emilie.
南京夜网

Geoff Smith on Stockton beach at low-tide this week with his grand-daughters Abigail Black, left, and Phoebe Lodge.

A photograph taken of Stockton beach from a similar angle last week.

Geoff Smith with his mother Joan and daughter Alysha on Stockton beach in 1981.

A photograph taken of Stockton beach from a similar angle last week.

Local surfers on Stockton beach in 1966. Picture: Geoff Smith

Geoff Smith on Stockton beach this week.

Geoff Smith on Stockton beach this week.

TweetFacebookIt just gets worse and worse every year. The amount of sand loss is enormous, it’s a terrible thing to watch.

Geoff Smith, Stockton resident

Over the past centuryStockton beach has lost more than 10 million cubic metres of sand and the seabed has droppedup to seven metres.

ANewcastle City Council report issued in 2001 found coastal degradation wasincreasingdramatically, from an annual average of 50,000 cubic metres of lost sand to 170,000 cubic metres, or enoughto fill more than 113 Olympic pools.

Read more: Stockton erosion hits crisis point

With no funding for a long-term solution to halt the erosion, the problem is getting worse.

Each year east coast lowstorm surgespushhuge waves into the Mitchell St rock wall stripping the coastline of sand.

With Newcastle and Stocktonbreakwallstrapping shore drift sand at Nobbys, there is not enough sand to replenish Stockton beach.

Experts have estimated there is a4.4km-wide sand depositoff Nobbys containing 32 million cubic metres of sand,meant for Stockton beach.

Residents are campaigning for the Port of Newcastle tofund a long-term solution to the erosion problem that is largely caused by the Harbour-entrance breakwaters.

SURF’S UP: A group of locals on Stockton beach’s extensive sand dunes along Mitchell Street in 1966. Picture: Geoff Smith

But a spokeswoman for the Port of Newcastle said the beach was “outside” the port boundary andnot part of the port lease landholdings.

“The breakwaters and Macquarie Pier are NSW government assets,” she said.

The Port of Newcastlewas privatised in 2014 for $1.75 billion to a 50/50 joint venture between Chinese and Australian interests.Soon afterwards, the new owners revalued the business to be worth $2.4 billion.

Residents also arguethat the NSW government, that receives millions each year in coal royalties from the port, should help foot the bill.

Breakwalls, groynes, artificial reefs,other off-shore structures and sand replenishing are among the long-term solutions so far discussed, someestimated to costmore than $30 million.

Newcastle City Counciland Stockton community members are developing a plan by September to identify short and medium-term solutions. Councilthen hastwo yearsto lodgea coastal management program that would include long-term solutions.

Both plans will be used in an effort toattract funding.

Comments are closed.